Kline stumps against another public option

September 17th, 2009 – 10:13 AM by Eric Roper

Kline House Floor.JPGAs the House prepares to vote on a bill that would largely do away with private lending in higher education, Rep. John Kline railed yesterday against the expansion of a “public option” in the student loan industry.

This all sounds very familiar.

“We’re not talking about health care today, but perhaps we should be,” said Kline, the top Republican on the Education and Labor committee. “The vote we will take on student lending is a culmination of a plan set in motion more than a decade and a half ago – and one that bears an eerily strong resemblance to the health care debate that rages on today.”

Kline explained that moving toward a fully government option means moving away from “the choice, the competition, and innovation of the private sector.”

He said, “What is absolutely clear is that forcing the public option is a government takeover.”

It will mean that school across the country will have to “scramble to make the personnel and infrastructure changes necessary to administer a program that is run by the Federal Government.”

It may sound like the health care debate, but it surely won’t last as long. The bill is expected to pass today.

Update: Rep. Michele Bachmann just blogged at Townhall.com that the student loan public option is “not to be confused with the public option for health care — but the similarities can’t be overlooked”

23 Responses to "Kline stumps against another public option"

להקיא says:

September 17th, 2009 at 11:27 am

Three.

Major Roger Healey says:

September 17th, 2009 at 12:06 pm

Fannie Mae & Freddie Mac. Do we really need more of these.

John E Iacono says:

September 17th, 2009 at 12:48 pm

Another masterpiece lost in transmission.

I won’t bother for a month or so.

SgtPendleton says:

September 17th, 2009 at 12:53 pm

John, if I’m writing an extra long screed, I usually write it in notepad or something, then paste it in — works pretty good, and you don’t lose all that work.

Thanks for the spam Major Heel.

Deacon Blues says:

September 17th, 2009 at 1:03 pm

“Fannie Mae & Freddie Mac. Do we really need more of these.”

Well you obviously have no idea what you’re talking about, that much is clear.

John E Iacono says:

September 17th, 2009 at 1:19 pm

Sarge,

I do that, but when I try to resend I get a message that says I already sent that!

Deacon Blues says:

September 17th, 2009 at 1:25 pm

Carfel Jay, the word l0an will get caught up in the filter if you spell it with an o.

Deacon Blues says:

September 17th, 2009 at 1:25 pm

Carfel John, the word l0an will get caught up in the filter if you spell it with an o.

monty says:

September 17th, 2009 at 1:33 pm

Kline is moving politics toward every campaign managers dream: the one-size-fits-all buzzword

SgtPendleton says:

September 17th, 2009 at 1:49 pm

I’m really disappointed in this dickhedded-ness. Especially after seeing him pictured with the inherently decent Jim Ramstad.

Greg 63 says:

September 17th, 2009 at 1:53 pm

It’s sad that people fight against making sure other folks have the ability to be healthy and get an education….

why the fight over those things?

Isn’t it better that this country is healthy and educated?

Are healthcare and education only for those that can afford it?

dubble_a_ron says:

September 17th, 2009 at 2:40 pm

Is it just me, or is there a puppeteer’s stick up this Kline guy’s kiester?

Jay says:

September 17th, 2009 at 2:48 pm

“Are healthcare and education only for those that can afford it?”

Higher education and specialized healthcare? yes.

Basic education (K-12) and basic healthcare? No.

This country and the taxpayers in it do not “owe” anyone a college education.

Jay says:

September 17th, 2009 at 2:51 pm

Someone correct me if I am wrong, but aren’t student l0ans among the worst kinds of debt that the private sector can take on? Ridiculous repayment terms, low rates, and high defaults.

I was under the impression that most of the student l0ans in this country were already being provided by the government. Who or what private entity is standing in line battling to be the next one to take on the next round of student debt? Hopefully not my bank.

Jay says:

September 17th, 2009 at 2:55 pm

Thanks for the heads up on L0ans spelling, DB. That must have been the trigger that was kicking my posts out on yesterday’s thread too…..other than the F-U post i submitted out of frustration with the filter.

I half expected that one to post, just to spite me.

dubble_a_ron says:

September 17th, 2009 at 2:58 pm

” was under the impression that most of the student l0ans in this country were already being provided by the government. ”

No, currently they are from private lenders but the govt guarantees them and sets guidelines for rates and paymet terms. Although the default rate is high, creditors or the govt usually collect eventually. It is damn near impossible for the debtors to have the debt forgiven, even if they are bankrupt. It just follows you around until eventually you make good on it.

Greg 63 says:

September 17th, 2009 at 3:00 pm

“Higher education and specialized healthcare? yes”

Why?

Then again, I think EVERYONE should be required to serve at least 2 years in our military …

Earsall Mackbee says:

September 17th, 2009 at 3:02 pm

Jay, but it IS in the nation’s best interest to have a better educated populus.

I think the only advantage to being a student l0an lender is they’re not dischargable in bankruptcy.

And I live in Kline’s district and I always remember he made a big deal about being the guy who toted around the attache case with the nuke codes. The cynic in me said “So I should vote for you because you were the world’s most trustworthy bellhop?”

dubble_a_ron says:

September 17th, 2009 at 3:08 pm

The best investment ths country ever made was to send WWII vets to school on the GI Bill.

Got paid back big time in increased revenue.

Greg 63 says:

September 17th, 2009 at 3:13 pm

“Got paid back big time in increased revenue. ”

No doubt.

Our biggest opportunities are in our population.

Jay says:

September 18th, 2009 at 8:38 am

If you want to talk about rewarding someone with reduced cost education in return for serving the nation in our military, you get no argument from me.

If you wish to claim that it is in the best interest of the country to educate our citizens, that gets no argument either.

If you wish to somehow make the leap that college should be free for anyone who cannot afford it otherwise, that’s where you lose me.

As I said in response to Greg when he asked if education is only for those wealthy enough to afford it……the government owes our kids a quality k-12 education funded by tax dollars. If you wish to pursue the luxury of further education- you’re on your own. I don’t see the issue with that.

I feel the same way about government providing basic health care, but not providing free nose jobs or breast enhancements.

Jay says:

September 18th, 2009 at 9:10 am

AARon: “No, currently they are from private lenders but the govt guarantees them and sets guidelines for rates and paymet terms.”

Thanks for the feedback. Given that, if I am a private lender, why would I want to participate in that? I don’t get where Kline is coming from with this. I don’t see it as much of an opportunity for the private sector currentlt. Who cares if the government wants to throw a public option out there?

dubble_a_ron says:

September 18th, 2009 at 12:51 pm

I’m not sure, Jay, but I think private lenders are in it because the debt is guranteed and they can bundle the student lo@ns into low return bonds to sell to cautious investors, something like that.
I don’t get where Kline is coming from either, except that I get the impression someone is briefing him on his talking points…

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